Auteur Sujet: Zika WCG  (Lu 1684 fois)

0 Membres et 1 Invité sur ce sujet

ousermaatre

  • Gentil admin
  • Messages: 11487
  • Boinc'eur devant l'éternel
  • *******
  •   
Zika WCG
« le: 19 mai 2016 à 18:43 »
article source: http://www.worldcommunitygrid.org/about_us/viewNewsArticle.do?articleId=480

Help an International Research Team Fight the Zika Virus
By: Dr. Carolina Horta Andrade
Universidade Federal de Goiás, Brazil
19 mai 2016    

Récapitulatif
The Zika virus was relatively unknown until 2015, when it made headlines due its rapid spread and its link to severe brain-related deficiencies in newborns born to mothers who contracted the virus while pregnant. Dr. Carolina Horta Andrade, the principal investigator for the new OpenZika project, discusses how she and an international team of researchers are using World Community Grid to accelerate the search for an effective anti-Zika treatment.
 


Dr. Carolina Horta Andrade, principal investigator for OpenZika

Introduction

Few people had heard of the Zika virus before 2015, when it began rapidly spreading in the Americas, particularly in Brazil. The virus is mostly spread by Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, although sexual and blood transmission are also possible. A currently unknown percentage of pregnant women who have contracted the Zika virus have given birth to infants with a condition called microcephaly, which results in severe brain development issues. In other cases, adults and children who contract the Zika virus have suffered paralysis and other neurological problems.

Currently, there is no treatment for the Zika virus and no vaccine. Given that Zika has quickly become an international public health concern, my team and I are working with researchers here in Brazil as well as in the United States to look for possible treatments, and we are using World Community Grid to accelerate our project.

Background

The world has become increasingly alarmed about the Zika virus, and with good reason. Until recently there has been little research on this disease, but in the past few months it has been linked to severe brain deficiencies in some infants as well as potential neurological issues in children and adults. As a scientist and a citizen of Brazil, which has been greatly affected by Zika, I am committed to the fight against the virus, but my team and I will need the help of World Community Grid volunteers to provide the massive computational power required for our search for a Zika treatment.

I am a professor at the Universidade Federal de Goiás (UFG) in Brazil, and the director of LabMol, a university laboratory which searches for treatments for neglected diseases and cancer. My field is medicinal and computational chemistry, with an emphasis on drug design and discovery for neglected diseases. I first became interested in working in this area because these are diseases that do not interest pharmaceutical companies, since they mainly affect marginalized populations in underdeveloped and developing countries. However, these diseases are highly debilitating and, for most of them, there is no adequate drug treatment. Brazil is vulnerable to a number of neglected diseases, such as dengue, malaria, leishmaniasis, schistosomiasis, and others. My greatest desire is to find treatments to improve the lives of thousands of people throughout the world who suffer from these diseases.

In 2015, I started a project in collaboration with Dr. Sean Ekins, a pharmacologist with extensive research experience, to focus on the development of computational models to identify active compounds against the dengue virus, which is a serious mosquito-borne disease found throughout the world. These active compounds could become candidates for antiviral drugs. We are now at the stage of selecting compounds to start laboratory tests. In January of 2016, when the Zika virus outbreak in Brazil became alarming, Sean and I decided to expand our dengue research, and we included the Zika virus in our work, since these two diseases are from the same family of viruses.



Dr. Sean Ekins, CEO, Collaborations Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Sean invited me and other collaborators to write a perspective paper that was published in the beginning of 2016, about the need for open drug discovery for the Zika virus. This work grabbed the attention of scientific illustrator John Liebler, who wanted to produce a picture of the complete Zika virion. We are using the illustration he created (shown below) as a visual for the OpenZika project.



Image copyright John Liebler, www.ArtoftheCell.com. All rights reserved. Used by permission.

John's interest inspired us to try to model every protein in the Zika virus, which directly led to writing a groundbreaking paper with homology models of all the proteins of the Zika virus. (Homology models, which are computational, three-dimensional renderings of proteins within an organism, are useful when the structure of a protein is not experimentally known, which is the case with the Zika virus.)

The OpenZika Research Team

After Sean and I began our work on the Zika virus, he introduced me to World Community Grid. Sean has also collaborated with Dr. Alexander Perryman of Rutgers University, New Jersey Medical School, who was previously at The Scripps Research Institute where he played a key role in two World Community Grid projects: Fight AIDS@Home and GO Fight Against Malaria. Sean and Alex are both co-principal investigators with me on the OpenZika project.



Dr. Alexander Perryman, co-primary investigator, and Dr. Joel Freundlich, collaborator, Rutgers University New Jersey Medical School

The research team also includes my colleagues at UFG, Dr. Rodolpho Braga, Dr. Melina Mottin and Dr. Roosevelt Silva; Dr. Jair L. Siqueira-Neto from University of California, San Diego; and Dr. Wim Degrave of the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation in Brazil, who is already working with World Community Grid on the Uncovering Genome Mysteries project, among others.



The UFG team includes Dr. Rodolpho Braga, Dr. Carolina Horta Andrade, Dr. Melina Mottin and Dr. Roosevelt Silva (not pictured).

This large group of collaborators means that the team has every set of skills and experience necessary to conduct this research end-to-end, as some of the researchers are computational modeling experts while others have extensive laboratory experience.

Our Goals

The OpenZika project on World Community Grid aims to identify drug candidates to treat the Zika virus in people who have been infected. The project will use software to screen millions of chemical compounds against the target proteins that the Zika virus likely uses to survive and spread in the human body, based on what is known from similar diseases such as dengue virus and yellow fever. As science's knowledge of the Zika virus increases in the coming months and key proteins are identified, the OpenZika team will use the new knowledge to refine our search.

Our work on World Community Grid is only the first step in the larger project of discovering a new drug to fight the Zika virus. Next, we will analyze the data obtained from World Community Grid’s virtual screening to choose the compounds that show the most promise. After we have selected and tested compounds that could be effective in killing the Zika virus, we will publish our results. As soon as we have proven that some of the candidate compounds can actually kill or disable the virus in cell-based tests, we and other labs can then modify the molecules to increase their potency against the virus, while ensuring that these modified compounds are safe and non-toxic.

We are committed to releasing all the results to the public as soon as they are completed, so other scientists can help advance the development of some of these active compounds into new drugs. We hope that OpenZika will include a second stage, where we can perform virtual screenings on many more compounds.

Without this research--and other projects that are studying the Zika virus--this disease could become an even bigger threat due to the rapid spread of the virus by mosquitoes, blood and sexual transmission. The link between the Zika virus in pregnant women and severe brain-based disorders in children could impact a generation with larger than usual numbers of members who have serious neurological difficulties.

And without the resources of World Community Grid, using only the resources of our lab, we would only be able to screen a few thousand compounds against some of the Zika proteins, or it would take years to screen millions of compounds against all Zika proteins. This would severely limit our potential for drug discovery.

Enlisting the help of World Community Grid volunteers will enable us to computationally evaluate over 20 million compounds in just the initial phase (and potentially up to 90 million compounds in future phases). Thus, running the OpenZika project on World Community Grid will allow us to greatly expand the scale of our project, and it will accelerate the rate at which we can obtain the results toward an antiviral drug for the Zika virus.

By working together and sharing our work with the scientific community, many other researchers in the world will also be able to take promising molecular candidates forward, to accelerate progress towards defeating the Zika outbreak.

ousermaatre

  • Gentil admin
  • Messages: 11487
  • Boinc'eur devant l'éternel
  • *******
  •   
Re : Zika WCG
« Réponse #1 le: 20 mai 2016 à 21:03 »
Aider une équipe internationale de chercheurs contre le virus Zika
Par le Dr. Carolina Horta Andrade
Universidade Federal de Goiás, Brésil
19 mai 2016    

Récapitulatif
Le virus Zika était relativement inconnu avant 2015, lorsqu’il a fait les gros titres dus à sa diffusion rapide et à son lien supposé avec les troubles cérébraux sévères des nouveau-nés transmis par leurs mères ayant contracté le virus lorsqu’elles étaient enceintes. Le Dr. Carolina Horta Andrade, la chercheuse principale pour le nouveau projet OpenZika, explique comment elle et une équipe internationale de chercheurs vont utiliser le World Community Grid afin d’accélérer la recherche pour un traitement anti-Zika efficace.
 


Dr. Carolina Horta Andrade, chercheuse principale d’OpenZika

Introduction

Peu de personnes avaient entendu parler du virus Zika avant 2015, lorsqu’il a commencé subitement à s'étendre sur le continent américain, particulièrement au Brésil. Le virus est surtout propagé par le moustique Aedes aegypti, bien qu’une transmission sexuelle et sanguine soient possibles. Un pourcentage actuellement inconnu des femmes enceintes qui ont contracté le virus Zika ont donné naissance à des nouveaux-nés souffrant d’une maladie appelée microcéphalie, qui aboutit à un développement mental plus ou moins retardé. Dans d'autres cas, des adultes et des enfants qui contractent le virus Zika sont touchés par la paralysie et d'autres problèmes neurologiques.

Actuellement, il n’y a aucun traitement ni vaccin contre le virus Zika. Étant donné que le Zika est rapidement devenu une préoccupation de santé publique internationale, mon équipe et moi collaborent avec des chercheurs ici au Brésil ainsi qu'aux États-Unis pour trouver des traitements possibles,  et nous utilisons le World Community Grid pour accélérer notre projet.

Contexte

Le Monde est aujourd’hui de plus en plus alarmé par le virus Zika, et avec forte raison. Jusqu’à récemment il y a eu peu de recherche sur cette maladie, mais au cours des quelques derniers mois elle a été liée à des déficiences cérébrales sévères sur des nourrissons ainsi que sur de potentielles atteintes neurologiques sur des enfants et des adultes. En tant que scientifique et citoyenne brésilienne, qui a été fortement affectée par le Zika, je suis déterminée à me battre contre le virus, mais mon équipe et moi aurons besoin du soutien des volontaires du WCG afin de fournir la puissance de calcul massive exigée pour notre recherche d'un traitement Zika.

Je suis professeure à l’Université fédérale de Goiás (UFG) au Brésil, et la directrice de LabMol, un laboratoire universitaire qui cherche des traitements pour des maladies négligées et le cancer. Mon domaine est la chimie médicinale et informatique, en mettant l’accent sur la conception de médicaments et la recherche en maladies négligées. J’ai d’abord commencé à m’intéresser au travail dans ce domaine parce que celles-ci sont des maladies qui n'intéressent pas les laboratoires pharmaceutiques, puisqu'elles affectent principalement des populations marginalisées dans des pays en voie de développement ou sous-développés. Cependant, ces maladies sont très invalidantes et, pour la plupart d’entre elles, il n’existe pas de traitements médicamenteux adéquats. Le Brésil est vulnérable à un certain nombre de maladies négligées, comme la dengue, la malaria, la leishmaniose, la schistosomiase et d’autres. Mon plus grand souhait serait de constater que des traitements améliorent la vie de milliers de gens à travers le Monde souffrant de ces maladies.

En 2015, J'ai commencé un projet en collaboration avec le Dr. Sean Ekins, un pharmacologue ayant une vaste expérience de recherche, en se concentrant sur le développement de modèles informatiques pour identifier des composés actifs contre le virus de la dengue, qui est une grave maladie transmise par les moustiques dans le monde entier. Ces composés actifs pourraient devenir des candidats pour des médicaments antiviraux. Nous en sommes maintenant à l'étape de choisir des composés pour commencer des essais en laboratoire. En janvier 2016, lorsque l'éruption virale Zika au Brésil est devenue alarmante, Sean and moi avons décidé d’élargir notre recherche sur la dengue, et nous avons inclus le virus Zika dans notre travail, puisque ces deux maladies sont de la même famille virale.



Dr. Sean Ekins, CEO, Collaborations Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Sean m'a invitée ainsi que d'autres collaborateurs à écrire un article de point de vue scientifique qui a été publié au début de 2016, sur la nécessité d’une découverte d’un médicament pour le virus Zika. Ce travail a saisi l'attention de l'illustrateur scientifique John Liebler, qui a voulu produire une image complète de la molécule du Zika. Nous utilisons l'illustration qu'il a créée (montrée ci-dessous) comme visuel pour le projet OpenZika.



Droit d’image (copyright) John Liebler, www.ArtoftheCell.com. Tous droits réservés. Utilisé selon permission.

L'intérêt de John nous a inspiré pour essayer de modeler chaque protéine du virus Zika, qui a directement mené à l'écriture d'un article novateur avec les modèles homologues de toutes les protéines du virus Zika. (Les modèles homologues qui sont informatisés et les rendus tridimensionnels de protéines dans un organisme, sont utiles lorsque la structure d'une protéine n'est pas connue expérimentalement, ce qui est le cas pour le virus Zika.)

L’équipe de recherche d‘OpenZika

Après que Sean et moi ayons commencé notre travail sur le virus Zika, il m’a présenté le World Community Grid. Sean avait déjà collaboré avec le Dr. Alexander Perryman de l’Université Rutgers, Ecole de Médecine du New Jersey, qui était auparavant à l’Institut de recherche Scripps où il a joué un rôle clé sur deux projets du WCG: Fight AIDS@Home and GO Fight Against Malaria. Sean et Alex sont tous deux co-chercheurs principaux avec moi sur le projet OpenZika.



Dr. Alexander Perryman, co-chercheur principal, et Dr. Joel Freundlich, collaborateur, Ecole de médecine Université Rutgers, New Jersey.

L‘ équipe de recherche inclut aussi mes collègues d’UFG, le Dr. Rodolpho Braga, le Dr. Melina Mottin et le Dr. Roosevelt Silva; le Dr. Jair L. Siqueira-Neto de l’Université de Californie, San Diego; et le Dr. Wim Degrave de la Fondation Oswaldo Cruz au Brésil, qui travaille déjà sur le World Community Grid au sein du projetthe Uncovering Genome Mysteries, entre autres.



L’équipe de l’UFG inclut le Dr. Rodolpho Braga, le Dr. Carolina Horta Andrade, le Dr. Melina Mottin and le Dr. Roosevelt Silva (pas sur la photo).

Ce large groupe de collaborateurs signifie que l'équipe est composée d’un ensemble de compétences et a l'expérience nécessaire afin de conduire cette recherche de bout en bout, certains des chercheurs sont des experts de modélisation informatiques tandis que d'autres ont une vaste expérience en laboratoire.

Nos objectifs

Le projet OpenZika sur le WCG a pour but d'identifier des candidats médicamenteux pour traiter le virus Zika sur les personnes qui ont été infectées. Le projet se servira d’un logiciel afin d’examiner des millions de composés chimiques sur les protéines cibles que le virus Zika utilise probablement pour survivre et s'étendre dans le corps humain, selon ce qui est connu des maladies semblables comme le virus de la dengue et la fièvre jaune. Lorsque les connaissances scientifiques du virus Zika auront augmenté durant les prochains mois et les protéines cibles seront identifiées, l’équipe OpenZika utilisera ces nouvelles connaissances pour affiner notre recherche.
Notre travail sur le World Community Grid n’est que la première étape dans le plus grand projet de découvrir un nouveau médicament afin de combattre le virus Zika. Ensuite, nous analyserons les données obtenues du dépistage virtuel du WCG afin de choisir les composés qui seront les plus prometteurs. Après que nous ayons déterminé et ayons testé les composés qui pourraient être efficaces dans la destruction du virus Zika, nous publierons nos résultats. Comme nous l'avons prouvé certains des composés candidats peuvent en réalité tuer ou désactiver le virus dans des tests à base de cellules, nous et d'autres laboratoires pouvons alors modifier les molécules pour augmenter leur puissance contre le virus, en s’assurant que ces composés modifiés soient sûrs et non-toxiques.

Nous nous engageons à publier tous les résultats au public aussitôt qu'ils seront complets, ainsi d'autres scientifiques pourront aider à avancer le développement de certains de ces composés actifs dans de nouveaux médicaments. Nous espérons que le projet OpenZika comportera une seconde étape, où nous pourrons exécuter des projections virtuelles sur beaucoup plus de composés.

Sans cette recherche-et d’autres projets qui étudient le virus Zika- cette maladie pourrait devenir une plus grande menace en raison de la diffusion rapide du virus par les moustiques, le sang et la transmission sexuelle. Le lien entre le virus Zika sur les femmes enceintes et les troubles cérébraux graves sur les enfants pourraient avoir un impact plus fort sur toute une génération par rapport aux nombres de personnes qui ont des difficultés neurologiques sérieuses actuellement.

Et sans les ressources du World Community Grid, en utilisant que les ressources de notre laboratoire, nous ne pourrions seulement examiner que quelques milliers de composés sur certaines des protéines du Zika, et cela prendrait des années pour examiner des millions de composés sur toutes les protéines du Zika. Ceci limiterait sérieusement notre potentiel pour la découverte de médicaments.

En mettant à contribution les volontaires du WCG cela nous permettra par informatique d’évaluer plus de 20 millions de composés juste dans la phase initiale (et potentiellement jusqu'à 90 millions de composés dans les phases futures). Ainsi,  exécuter le projet d'OpenZika sur le World Community Grid nous permettra de grandement étendre l'échelle de notre projet, et cela accélérera le taux de réussite duquel nous pourrons obtenir des résultats vers un médicament antiviral contre le Zika.

En travaillant ensemble et en partageant notre travail avec la communauté scientifique, beaucoup d'autres chercheurs dans le monde pourront aussi découvrir des candidats moléculaires prometteurs, et ainsi accélérer le progrès vers la mise en déroute du Zika.

[AF>Libristes>Jip] Elgrande71

  • Gentil admin
  • Messages: 4792
  • Boinc'eur devant l'éternel
  • *******
  •   
Re : Re : Zika WCG
« Réponse #2 le: 22 mai 2016 à 15:48 »
Aider une équipe internationale de chercheurs contre le virus Zika
Par le Dr. Carolina Horta Andrade
Université Fédérale du Goiás, Brésil
19 mai 2016    

Récapitulatif
Le virus Zika était relativement inconnu avant 2015, lorsqu’il a fait les gros titres à cause de sa diffusion rapide et de son lien supposé avec des troubles cérébraux sévères des nouveau-nés transmis par leurs mères qui avaient contracté le virus pendant la grossesse . Le Dr. Carolina Horta Andrade, chercheuse principale pour le nouveau projet OpenZika, explique comment elle et une équipe internationale de chercheurs vont utiliser le World Community Grid afin d’accélérer la recherche pour un traitement anti-Zika efficace.
 


Dr. Carolina Horta Andrade, chercheuse principale d’OpenZika

Introduction

Peu de personnes avaient entendu parler du virus Zika avant 2015, lorsqu’il a commencé subitement à s'étendre sur le continent américain, particulièrement au Brésil. Le virus est surtout propagé par le moustique Aedes aegypti, bien qu’une transmission sexuelle et sanguine soient possibles. Un pourcentage actuellement inconnu de femmes enceintes ayant contracté le virus Zika ont donné naissance à des nouveaux-nés souffrant d’une maladie appelée microcéphalie, qui aboutit à de graves problèmes de développement du cerveau. Dans d'autres cas, des adultes et des enfants qui contractent le virus Zika ont souffert de paralysie et d'autres problèmes neurologiques.

Actuellement, il n’y a ni traitement ni vaccin contre le virus Zika. Étant donné que le Zika est rapidement devenu une préoccupation de santé publique internationale, mon équipe et moi travaillons avec des chercheurs ici au Brésil ainsi qu'aux États-Unis pour trouver des traitements possibles, et nous utilisons le World Community Grid pour accélérer notre projet.

Historique

Le Monde est aujourd’hui de plus en plus alarmé par le virus Zika, et avec raison. Jusqu’à récemment il y a eu peu de recherche sur cette maladie, mais au cours des derniers mois elle a été liée à des déficiences cérébrales sévères chez certains nourrissons ainsi que sur de potentielles atteintes neurologiques chez les enfants et les adultes. En tant que scientifique et citoyenne brésilienne, qui a été fortement affectée par le Zika, je suis déterminée à me battre contre le virus, mais mon équipe et moi aurons besoin du soutien des volontaires du WCG afin de fournir l'énorme puissance de calcul nécessaire pour notre recherche d'un traitement Zika.

Je suis professeure à l’Université fédérale du Goiás (UFG) au Brésil, et la directrice de LabMol, un laboratoire universitaire qui recherche des traitements pour des maladies négligées et le cancer. Mon domaine est la chimie médicinale et computationnelle, mettant l’accent sur la conception et la découverte de médicaments pour les maladies négligées. J’ai d’abord commencé à m’intéresser au travail dans ce domaine parce que cz sont des maladies qui n'intéressent pas les laboratoires pharmaceutiques, puisqu'elles affectent principalement des populations marginalisées dans des pays en voie de développement ou sous-développés. Cependant, ces maladies sont très invalidantes et, pour la plupart d’entre elles, il n’y a pas de traitements médicamenteux adéquats. Le Brésil est vulnérable à un certain nombre de maladies négligées, comme la dengue, la malaria, la leishmaniose, la schistosomiase et d’autres. Mon plus grand désir est de trouver des traitements pour améliorer la vie de milliers de gens à travers le Monde souffrant de ces maladies.

En 2015, J'ai commencé un projet en collaboration avec le Dr. Sean Ekins, un pharmacologue ayant une vaste expérience de recherche, en se concentrant sur le développement de modèles informatiques pour identifier des composés actifs contre le virus de la dengue, qui est une grave maladie transmise par les moustiques dans le monde entier. Ces composés actifs pourraient devenir des candidats pour des médicaments antiviraux. Nous en sommes maintenant au stade de la sélection des composés pour commencer des essais en laboratoire. En janvier 2016, lorsque l'éruption virale Zika au Brésil est devenue alarmante, Sean and moi avons décidé d’élargir notre recherche sur la dengue, et nous avons inclus le virus Zika dans notre travail, puisque ces deux maladies sont de la même famille virale.



Dr. Sean Ekins, CEO, Collaborations Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Sean m'a invitée ainsi que d'autres collaborateurs à écrire un article de point de vue scientifique qui a été publié au début de 2016, sur la nécessité d’une découverte d’un médicament libre pour le virus Zika. Ce travail a attiré l'attention de l'illustrateur scientifique John Liebler, qui a voulu produire une image complète de la molécule du Zika. Nous utilisons l'illustration qu'il a créée (montrée ci-dessous) comme un graphique pour le projet OpenZika.



Droit d’image (copyright) John Liebler, www.ArtoftheCell.com. Tous droits réservés. Utilisé selon permission.

L'intérêt de John nous a inspiré pour essayer de modeler chaque protéine du virus Zika, qui a directement mené à l'écriture d'un article novateur avec des modèles homologues de toutes les protéines du virus Zika. (Les modèles homologues qui sont informatisés et les rendus tridimensionnels de protéines au sein d'un organisme, sont utiles lorsque la structure d'une protéine n'est pas connue expérimentalement, ce qui est le cas pour le virus Zika.)

L’équipe de recherche d‘OpenZika

Après que Sean et moi ayons commencé notre travail sur le virus Zika, il m’a présenté le World Community Grid. Sean avait déjà collaboré avec le Dr. Alexander Perryman de l’Université Rutgers, Ecole de Médecine du New Jersey, qui était auparavant à l’Institut de recherche Scripps où il a joué un rôle clé sur deux projets du WCG: Fight AIDS@Home and GO Fight Against Malaria. Sean et Alex sont tous deux co-chercheurs principaux avec moi sur le projet OpenZika.



Dr. Alexander Perryman, co-chercheur principal, et Dr. Joel Freundlich, collaborateur, Ecole de médecine Université Rutgers, New Jersey.

L‘ équipe de recherche inclut aussi mes collègues d’UFG, le Dr. Rodolpho Braga, le Dr. Melina Mottin et le Dr. Roosevelt Silva; le Dr. Jair L. Siqueira-Neto de l’Université de Californie, San Diego; et le Dr. Wim Degrave de la Fondation Oswaldo Cruz au Brésil, qui travaille déjà avec le World Community Grid au sein du projetthe Uncovering Genome Mysteries, parmi d'autres.



L’équipe de l’UFG inclut le Dr. Rodolpho Braga, le Dr. Carolina Horta Andrade, le Dr. Melina Mottin and le Dr. Roosevelt Silva (pas sur la photo).

Ce large groupe de collaborateurs signifie que l'équipe est composée d’un ensemble de compétences et a l'expérience nécessaire afin de conduire cette recherche de bout en bout, certains des chercheurs sont des experts de modélisation informatiques tandis que d'autres ont une vaste expérience en laboratoire.

Nos objectifs

Le projet OpenZika sur le WCG a pour but d'identifier des candidats médicamenteux pour traiter le virus Zika sur des personnes qui ont été infectées. Le projet utlisera un logiciel pour examiner des millions de composés chimiques contre les protéines cibles que le virus Zika utilise probablement pour survivre et s'étendre dans le corps humain, selon ce qui est connu des maladies semblables comme le virus de la dengue et la fièvre jaune. Lorsque les connaissances scientifiques du virus Zika auront augmenté durant les prochains mois et les protéines cibles seront identifiées, l’équipe OpenZika utilisera ces nouvelles connaissances pour affiner notre recherche.
Notre travail sur le World Community Grid n’est que la première étape d'un projet plus vaste de découverte d'un nouveau médicament afin de combattre le virus Zika. Ensuite, nous analyserons les données obtenues du criblage virtuel du WCG afin de choisir les composés qui seront les plus prometteurs. Après que nous ayons déterminé et testé les composés qui pourraient être efficaces dans la destruction du virus Zika, nous publierons nos résultats. Dès que nous aurons prouvé que certains des composés candidats peuvent vraiment tuer ou désactiver le virus dans des tests à base de cellules, nous et d'autres laboratoires pourrons alors modifier les molécules pour augmenter leur puissance contre le virus, en s’assurant que ces composés modifiés soient sûrs et non-toxiques.

Nous nous engageons à publier tous les résultats au public dès qu'ils seront complets, ainsi d'autres scientifiques pourront aider au développement de certains de ces composés actifs dans de nouveaux médicaments. Nous espérons que le projet OpenZika comportera une seconde étape, où nous pourrons exécuter des criblages virtuelles sur beaucoup plus de composés.

Sans cette recherche-et d’autres projets qui étudient le virus Zika- cette maladie pourrait devenir une plus grande menace en raison de la diffusion rapide du virus par les moustiques, le sang et la transmission sexuelle. Le lien entre le virus Zika chez les femmes enceintes et les troubles cérébraux graves sur les enfants pourraient affecter une génération plus vaste d'un nombre habituel de personnes qui ont des sérieuses difficultés neurologiques.

Et sans les ressources du World Community Grid, en utilisant que les ressources de notre laboratoire, nous ne pourrions seulement examiner que quelques milliers de composés sur certaines des protéines du Zika, et cela prendrait des années pour examiner des millions de composés sur toutes les protéines du Zika. Ceci limiterait sérieusement notre potentiel pour la découverte de médicaments.

En mettant à contribution les volontaires du WCG cela nous permettra par informatique d’évaluer plus de 20 millions de composés juste dans la phase initiale (et potentiellement jusqu'à 90 millions de composés dans les phases futures). Ainsi, exécuter le projet d'OpenZika sur le World Community Grid nous permettra de grandement étendre l'échelle de notre projet, et cela accélérera le rythme auquel nous pourrons obtenir des résultats vers un médicament antiviral contre le Zika.

En travaillant ensemble et en partageant notre travail avec la communauté scientifique, beaucoup d'autres chercheurs dans le monde pourront aussi mettre en avant des candidats moléculaires prometteurs, et ainsi accélérer le progrès vers la mise en déroute l'épidémie du Zika.
J'ai mis en rouge les corrections que je propose .
Merci ousermaatre pour ton travail .  :jap: :jap:
« Modifié: 22 mai 2016 à 19:58 par [AF>Libristes>Jip] Elgrande71 »
Debian - Distribution GNU/Linux de référence
Parabola GNU/Linux - Distribution GNU/Linux Libre
Solus

Jabber elgrande71@jit.si

JeromeC

  • CàA
  • Messages: 22943
  • Boinc'eur devant l'éternel
  • *****
  •   
Re : Zika WCG
« Réponse #3 le: 23 mai 2016 à 22:58 »
On pourrait le publier comme un article "pas dans les news" et ajouter une phrase et le lien dans l'article bref déjà publié sur Zika ?

De toutes façons je sais pas s'il n'est pas urgent d'attendre, cf la discussion sur la mise à jour du forum en cours.
Parce que c'était lui, parce que c'était moi.

ousermaatre

  • Gentil admin
  • Messages: 11487
  • Boinc'eur devant l'éternel
  • *******
  •   
Re : Zika WCG
« Réponse #4 le: 19 juin 2016 à 21:20 »
Alors, article posté sur le portail, non dans les news, mais dans la catégorie projets boinc-biologie, ici

Ajout d'un petit texte à l'article posté dans les news en bas de l'historique, ici

Qu'en pensez-vous?






DocPhilou1966

  • Messages: 1304
  • Boinc'eur devant l'éternel
  • *****
  •   
    • Mon Job
Re : Zika WCG
« Réponse #5 le: 20 juin 2016 à 21:01 »
 :plusun:
 
13800346^131072+1   935,840 (decimal)   2019-01-27 Generalized Fermat Prime Search

PhilTheNet

  • Messages: 1818
  • Boinc'eur devant l'éternel
  • *****
  •   
Re : Zika WCG
« Réponse #6 le: 20 juin 2016 à 21:18 »
Top
 
:plusun:


Mais aussi :

Scrat65

  • Messages: 320
  • Boinc'eur Confirmé
  • ***
  •   
Re : Zika WCG
« Réponse #7 le: 21 juin 2016 à 19:28 »
Merci pour la traduction et l'actualité sur le portail de l'AF. Cela permet de mieux comprendre les enjeux du projet OpenZika
Bonsoir chez vous.
« Modifié: 21 juin 2016 à 19:30 par Scrat65 »
« Nous sommes des nains juchés sur les épaules de géants ; nous voyons plus qu'eux, et plus loin ; non que notre regard soit perçant, ni élevée notre taille, mais nous sommes élevés, exhaussés, par leur stature gigantesque » Bernard de Chartres (XIIe siècle)

JeromeC

  • CàA
  • Messages: 22943
  • Boinc'eur devant l'éternel
  • *****
  •   
Re : Zika WCG
« Réponse #8 le: 21 juin 2016 à 22:49 »
:+1:
Parce que c'était lui, parce que c'était moi.

[AF>Libristes>Jip] Elgrande71

  • Gentil admin
  • Messages: 4792
  • Boinc'eur devant l'éternel
  • *******
  •   
Re : Zika WCG
« Réponse #9 le: 23 juin 2016 à 19:43 »
Merci Ousermaatre pour la traduction et la publication  :kookoo: :jap:
Debian - Distribution GNU/Linux de référence
Parabola GNU/Linux - Distribution GNU/Linux Libre
Solus

Jabber elgrande71@jit.si