Le Forum de l'Alliance Francophone

Nouvelles:

Auteur Sujet: La deuxième lettre d'information d'Einstein@Home  (Lu 2786 fois)

0 Membres et 1 Invité sur ce sujet

Hors ligne [AF>Libristes>Jip] Elgrande71

  • Gentil admin
  • Boinc'eur devant l'éternel
  • *******
  • Messages: 5105
  •   
    • [AF>Libristes] - La Mini-Team Libristes de L'Alliance Francophone sur BOINC
    • E-mail
A traduire donc

Dear Einstein@Home volunteers,

the five-year upgrade of the LIGO detectors has been completed and we
are a large step closer to the first direct detection of gravitational
waves, which will mark the beginning of a new era of astronomy. As we
are writing this newsletter, Advanced LIGO is beginning its first
observation run “O1” after an extensive comissioning phase and a
series of “engineering runs”. The Einstein@Home team is truly excited
and is looking forward to the most sensitive gravitational-wave data
ever recorded.

In the first week of September more than 200 gravitational-wave
scientists from the LIGO Virgo Scientific Collaboration gathered in
Budapest for their fall meeting. Many Einstein@Home team members were
present and reported on their ongoing gravitational-wave
searches. During the meeting, the seventh issue of the LIGO Magazine
was published, featuring a four page article on Einstein@Home. You can
read it for free at [1].

Our second newsletter this year features news from the project
administration and updates from our three searches for rapidly
rotating neutron stars (through gravitational waves, radio waves, and
gamma rays). We are very happy to report three new discoveries! One
was made in data from NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, and
three were made in data from the Arecibo Radio Telescope. See below
for more details on the discoveries.

Note that we are advertising a position for an Einstein@Home
computational scientist at UWM in Milwaukee [2]. If you have the
required skills and interest, please apply!

Bruce Allen, Director, Einstein@Home


News on the gravitational-wave search (M. Alessandra Papa)
----------------------------------------------------------
The Einstein@Home all-sky search for continuous gravitational wave
signals in the gravitational-wave frequency range from 50 Hertz to 510
Hertz is in its final stages. Thanks to your continued support we had
enough processing power to implement a hierarchy of follow-ups. Each
step was more sensitive than the previous one and would zoom in to a
signal, if present, and discard, at each step, more and more false
alarms (random fluctuations of noise mimicking a signal).

At the time of the first newsletter we were completing the first
follow-up (FU1), which looked at a total of 16 million candidates. Out
of these, the next stage (FU2) followed up about 5.5 million, using a
different set-up to increase the sensitivity. The data were split into
40 segments, each with a longer coherent observation time, namely 140
hours versus the 60 hours used in FU1. About one in every five
candidates that was looked at with FU2 was deemed worthy of being
further inspected with the third follow-up stage (FU3).

The third and final stage uses data segments of 140 hours coherent
observation time (like FU2) but with a much finer grid in parameter
space, again zooming in and increasing the sensitivity. According to
our studies, this should give us at least a 40% increase in
signal-to-noise ratio. This is sufficient to confidently separate a
possible signal from the background. In fact we expect to have no more
than a few candidates coming out of FU3, which could be confirmed or
discarded based on specific candidate-tailored studies.

FU3 is a short run, of order a few weeks, and ended in late
September. If we see something it will be extremely exciting! If we do
not, we will be able to set the most constraining upper limit on the
amplitude of continuous gravitational waves ever. And finally, the
upgraded and more sensitive Advanced LIGO detectors are coming online
these days, and we cannot wait to look at this new data.


News on the binary radio pulsar search (Benjamin Knispel)
---------------------------------------------------------
Our currently most active radio pulsar search is a more sensitive
re-analysis of the Parkes Multi-beam Pulsar Survey (PMPS). It covers a
larger parameter space than analyzed in a previous Einstein@Home
search of the same data set. Since the start in March we have
processed roughly 30% of all observations. So far no new discoveries
have been made, but we have seen some interesting candidates and
re-discovered many known pulsars.

Whenever we get ‘fresh’ data from the PALFA survey with the Arecibo
telescope, we sent them out to your GPUs and Android devices
immediately. Over the past months we received four batches of new
data. In the latest data, we have made new radio pulsar
discoveries. Three of them (J1955+29, J1853+00, and J1853+0029) have
already been confirmed by the required follow-up observation. Congrats
to Przemek Wisialski and Gary S. Grant II, robert dolezal and Jim
Trettel, and [TiDC] Chulma - S'inergy and boinc_qc whose computers
found the pulsars with the highest statistical significance! The
follow-up observations for one remaining candidate will be done soon
with the Arecibo radio telescope.

Finally, a paper reporting on an earlier Einstein@Home radio pulsar
discovery in PALFA data has been published in The Astrophysical
Journal [3]. You can read it for free on the arXiv preprint server
[4]. The paper presents the discovery of a millisecond pulsar in a
surprisingly eccentric orbit, and looks at how this system and the
four known similar ones might have formed. In any case, they cannot
have formed through what has been thought to be the standard way of
making millisecond pulsars, i.e., through spinning up an older pulsar
by transfer of matter from a companion star. You can read more
background info at [5].


News on the gamma-ray pulsar search (Holger Pletsch)
----------------------------------------------------
The various improvements offered by the latest, still ongoing, survey
of unidentified gamma-ray sources have borne first fruit. Earlier this
month we announced the Einstein@Home discovery of a new gamma-ray
pulsar hidden in plain sight in data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Space
Telescope, which has been published in the Astrophysical Journal
Letters [6] (open-access preprint available at [7], accompanying press
release at [8]). Further exciting candidate discoveries are currently
being studied in detail. We also examining the feasibility of
expanding the survey to other pulsar system types not yet searched on
Einstein@Home.


News from the project administration (Bernd Machenschalk)
---------------------------------------------------------
For the gamma-ray pulsar search we issued new application versions
that include a minor bug fix (typo in numerical constant) and feature
checkpointing during the last (“follow-up”) stage of a task, which was
previously not interruptable. This allows us to now slightly increase
the number of follow-up candidates to squeeze the last bit of
sensitivity out of the computation.

The “S6Bucket Follow-Up run #2” has ended (see above) and the third
stage of the follow-up will run until the end of September. After the
end of the third stage, there will be no new gravitational-wave search
for a while, and the project's CPUs will run 100% gamma-ray pulsar
search.

The binary radio pulsar search applications have been updated as well:
Optimizations that mainly reduce the amount of data that needs to be
shifted between GPU and CPU memory were implemented for both BRP4
(Arecibo data) and BRP6 (Barkes data), in application versions
1.52. The optimizations resulted in a speedup of up to 50%. There are
also CUDA application versions currently in Beta test with an updated
version of CUDA (5.5 instead of previously used 3.2). The speedup
gained from using these versions highly depends on the card used, it
varies between zero and another 50%.

For the general server infrastructure we performed additional numerous
system software and security updates, and am in the process of
replacing old servers that have become unreliable by modern hardware.

[1] http://www.ligo.org/magazine/LIGO-magazine-issue-7.pdf#page=18
[2] http://jobs.uwm.edu/postings/23976
[3] http://iopscience.iop.org/0004-637X/806/1/140/
[4] http://arxiv.org/abs/1504.03684
[5] http://einstein.phys.uwm.edu/forum_thread.php?id=11257
[6] http://iopscience.iop.org/2041-8205/809/1/L2/
[7] http://arxiv.org/abs/1508.00779/
[8] http://www.aei.mpg.de/1689618/EatHGPSRHidden

-----------------------------

If you would like to discuss this newsletter with other Einstein@Home
volunteers, and the project developers and scientists, please visit
this thread in the discussions forum:
http://einstein.phys.uwm.edu/forum_thread.php?id=11499


Thank you for your continued support, Bruce Allen, Benjamin Knispel,
Bernd Machenschalk, M. Alessandra Papa, and Holger Pletsch for the
Einstein@Home team
« Modifié: 04 November 2015 à 20:25 par [AF>Libristes>Jip] Elgrande71 »

Debian - Distribution GNU/Linux de référence
Parabola GNU/Linux - Distribution GNU/Linux Libre
MX Linux
Emmabuntüs

Jabber elgrande71@chapril.org


Hors ligne [AF>Libristes>Jip] Elgrande71

  • Gentil admin
  • Boinc'eur devant l'éternel
  • *******
  • Messages: 5105
  •   
    • [AF>Libristes] - La Mini-Team Libristes de L'Alliance Francophone sur BOINC
    • E-mail
Réponse #1 le: 04 November 2015 à 20:25
Voici ma traduction

Chers volontaires d'Einstein@Home,

La mise à jour des détecteurs LIGO s'est achevée après 5 ans de travaux et nous avons fait un grand pas en nous rapprochant de la première détection directe d'ondes gravitationnelles laquelle marquera le début d'une nouvelle ère de l'astronomie . Au moment de l'écriture de cette lettre d'information, Advanced LIGO a commencé sa première série d'observation « 01 », après sa phase de mise en service étendue et une batterie de test techniques . L'équipe d'Einstein@Home est vraiment excitée et attend avec impatience les données de la plus sensible onde gravitationnelle jamais enregistrée .

Dans la première semaine de Septembre, plus de 200 scientifiques des ondes gravitationnelles de la collaboration du LIGO Virgo se sont rassemblés pour leur réunion d'automne . De nombreux membres de l'équipe Einstein était présent et ont rendu compte de leurs recherches en cours sur les ondes gravitationnelles . Pendant cette réunion, le 7ème numéro du LIGO magazine , comportant un article de 4 pages sur Einsten@Home, est sorti . Vous pouvez le lire gratuitement ici [1] .

Notre seconde lettre d'informations de cette année comporte des nouvelles de l'administration et des mises à jour du projet de nos trois recherches sur les étoiles à neutrons à rotations rapides ( à travers les ondes gravitationnelles, les ondes radio et les rayons gamma ) . Nous sommes très heureux de déclarer 3 nouvelles découvertes ! Une a été réalisé grâce aux données du télescope spatial Gamma-Ray Fermi de la NASA et 3 autres grâce aux données du télescope radio d'Arecibo . Voir ci-dessous pour plus de détails sur ces découvertes .

Noter que nous communiquons sur un poste d'ingénieur informatique à Einstein@Home à l'UWM de Milwaukee [2] . Si vous avez les compétences requises et que vous êtes intéressé, veuillez faire votre demande .

Bruce Allen, Directeur, Einstein@Home


Nouvelles sur la recherche des ondes gravitationnelles (M. Alessandra Papa)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
La recherche plein ciel d'Einstein@Home de signaux continus d'onde gravitationnelle dans la gamme de fréquence de 50 à 510 Hz en est aux dernières étapes . Grâce à votre soutien constant, nous avons assez de puissance de calcul ( de traitement ) pour mettre en œuvre une hiérarchie de suivi . Chaque étape était plus délicate que la précédente et agrandirait un signal s'il était présent et rejetterait de plus en plus de fausses alarmes ( variations aléatoires du bruit imitant un signal ) .

A la date de la première lettre d'information, nous avions terminé le premier suivi (FU1), lequel portait sur un total de 16 millions de candidats . A partir de cela, le prochaine étape (FU2) suivait environ 5,5 millions, en utilisant une configuration différente pour augmenter la sensibilité . Les données étaient divisées en 40 segments, chacun avec un temps d'observation uniforme plus long, à savoir 140 heures contre 60 heures utilisées pour FU1 . Environ 1 candidat sur 5 qui étaient examinés avec FU2 méritait d'être inspecté minutieusement durant la troisième étape de suivi (FU3) .
La troisième et dernière étape utilise des segments de données de 140 heures de temps d'observation uniforme ( comme FU2 ) mais avec une grille plus fine dans un espace paramétrique, agrandissant et augmentant la sensibilité . Selon nos études, cela devrait nous donner au moins une augmentation de 40 % du rapport signal bruit . Cela est suffisant pour séparer en toute confiance un possible signal de bruit de fond . En fait, nous nous attendons à n'avoir que quelques candidats sortant de FU3, lequel pourrait être confirmé ou rejeté en se basant sur des études spécifiques de candidats adaptés .

FU3 est un court essai, de l'ordre de quelques semaines, et qui s'est terminé fin Septembre . Si nous voyons quelque chose, ce sera extrêmement excitant ! Sinon, nous pourrons fixer une limite supérieure plus contraignante sur l'amplitude des ondes gravitationnelles continues . Et enfin, les détecteurs plus sensibles et améliorés de l'Advanced LIGO ont été branché ces jours, et nous ne pouvons plus attendre pour examiner cette nouvelle donnée .


Nouvelles sur la recherche de pulsar binaire radio (Benjamin Knispel)
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Notre recherche réalisable des pulsars radio les plus actifs est une nouvelle analyse plus sensible de l'étude Parkes Multi-beam Pulsar (PMPS) . Elle couvre un plus large espace paramétrique que celle du même ensemble de donnée d'une recherche précédente d'Einstein@Home . Depuis son démarrage en Mars, nous avons traité approximativement 30 % de toutes les observations . Jusqu'à présent, aucune nouvelle découverte n'a été faite, mais nous avons vu quelques candidats intéressants et nous avons redécouvert beaucoup de pulsars connus .

Chaque fois que nous obtenons de nouvelles données de l'étude PALFA avec le télescope d'Arecibo, nous les envoyons immédiatement à vos GPUs et vos appareils Android . Au cours des mois passés, nous avons reçu quatre lots de nouvelle donnée . Dans les dernières données, nous avons découvert de nouveaux pulsars radio . Trois d'entre eux (J1955+29, J1853+00, et J1853+0029) ont déjà été confirmé par l'observation de suivi requise . Félicitations à Przemek Wisialski et Gary S. Grant II, robert dolezal et Jim Trettel, et [TiDC] Chulma – S'inergy et boinc_qc dont les ordinateurs ont trouvé des pulsars avec la plus haute importance statistique . Les observations de suivi pour le candidat restant sera bientôt effectué par le télescope radio d'Arecibo .

Enfin, un document faisant état d'un découverte antérieure d'un pulsar radio dans les données PALFA a été publié dans l'Astrophysical Journal [3]. Vous pouvez le lire gratuitement sur le serveur d'épreuve arXiv [4] . Le document présente la découverte d'un pulsar milliseconde qui a une orbite remarquablement excentré, et examine ce système et les 4 autres connus et similaires pour savoir comment ils auraient pu se former . En tous cas, ils n'ont pas pu se former par ce que nous pensons être la voie standard de formation des pulsars millisecondes, par exemple, à travers l'accélération de la rotation d'un vieux pulsar par transfert de matière d'une étoile compagnon . Vous pouvez lire un peu plus ici [5] .


Nouvelles sur la recherche de pulsar gamma (Holger Pletsch)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
Les diverses améliorations offertes par la dernière étude toujours en cours, sur les sources inconnues de rayons gamma a porté ses premiers fruits . Au début de ce mois, nous annoncions la découverte Einstein@Home d'un nouveau pulsar gamma caché dans les données du télescope spatial Fermi, laquelle a été publié dans les lettres de l'Astrophysical Journal [6] ( préimpression en accès ouvert disponible ici [7], accompagnement de communiqué de presse ici [8] ) . Davantage de découvertes excitantes de candidats sont actuellement étudiées en détail . Nous examinons la faisabilité d'étendre l'étude à d'autres types de système pulsar non encore recherchés dans Einstein@Home .


Nouvelles de l'administration du projet (Bernd Machenschalk)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Concernant la recherche de pulsar gamma, nous avons distribué de nouvelles versions de l'application qui inclut une correction de bogue mineure (typo dans une constante numérique) et la fonction de checkpointing au cours de la dernière étape de la tâche (« suivi »), laquelle ne pouvait pas auparavant être interrompu à tout moment . Cela nous permet maintenant  d'améliorer légèrement le nombre de candidats suivis pour intercaler le dernier bit de sensibilité hors du calcul .

Le « S6Bucket Follow-Up run #2 » a pris fin (voir au-dessus) et la troisième étape de suivi s'exécutera juqu'à la fin Septembre . Après la fin de cette troisième étape, il n'y aura plus de nouvelles recherches sur les ondes gravitationnelles pour un moment, et les projets CPUs seront à 100 % sur la recherche de pulsar gamma .

Les applications de la recherche des pulsars binaires radio ont aussi été mise à jour : des optimisations qui réduise principalement la quantité de données qui doit être échangé entre les mémoires des GPU et des CPU, ont été implémenté à la fois pour les applications BRP4 (Données Arecibo) et BRP6 (Données Barkes) dans leurs versions 1.52 . Il en résulte une accélération qui peut aller jusqu'à 50 % . Les applications CUDA actuellement en test bêta ont aussi été mise à jour vers la version 5.5 de CUDA ( La version 3.2 de CUDA était auparavant utilisée ) . Le gain de vitesse obtenu grâce à l'utilisation de ces versions dépend beaucoup de la carte utilisée (GPU), il varie de 0 à 50 % .

Concernant l'infrastructure générale du serveur, nous avons effectué de nombreuses mises à jour de sécurité et systèmes additionnelles et nous sommes dans un processus de remplacement des vieux serveurs qui deviennent peu fiable par rapport à du matériel neuf .

[1] http://www.ligo.org/magazine/LIGO-magazine-issue-7.pdf#page=18
[2] http://jobs.uwm.edu/postings/23976
[3] http://iopscience.iop.org/0004-637X/806/1/140/
[4] http://arxiv.org/abs/1504.03684
[5] http://einstein.phys.uwm.edu/forum_thread.php?id=11257
[6] http://iopscience.iop.org/2041-8205/809/1/L2/
[7] http://arxiv.org/abs/1508.00779/
[8] http://www.aei.mpg.de/1689618/EatHGPSRHidden

Si vous voulez discuter de cette lettre d'informations avec d'autres volontaires d'Einstein@Home, et les développeurs et les scientifiques du projet, rendez-vous dans ce fil de discussion du forum :
http://einstein.phys.uwm.edu/forum_thread.php?id=11499


Merci pour votre soutien constant, Bruce Allen, Benjamin Knispel,
Bernd Machenschalk, M. Alessandra Papa, and Holger Pletsch de l'équipe Einstein@Home
« Modifié: 04 November 2015 à 20:42 par [AF>Libristes>Jip] Elgrande71 »

Debian - Distribution GNU/Linux de référence
Parabola GNU/Linux - Distribution GNU/Linux Libre
MX Linux
Emmabuntüs

Jabber elgrande71@chapril.org


naz

  • Invité
Réponse #2 le: 04 November 2015 à 20:33
Merci infiniment pour la traduction  :jap:



Hors ligne [AF>Libristes>Jip] Elgrande71

  • Gentil admin
  • Boinc'eur devant l'éternel
  • *******
  • Messages: 5105
  •   
    • [AF>Libristes] - La Mini-Team Libristes de L'Alliance Francophone sur BOINC
    • E-mail
Réponse #3 le: 04 November 2015 à 20:44
Elle n'est certainement pas parfaite mais j'espère qu'elle reflète les grandes lignes du contenu de cette seconde lettre d'information du projet Einstein@Home .

Debian - Distribution GNU/Linux de référence
Parabola GNU/Linux - Distribution GNU/Linux Libre
MX Linux
Emmabuntüs

Jabber elgrande71@chapril.org


En ligne Maurice Goulois

  • Boinc'eur devant l'éternel
  • *****
  • Messages: 4544
  •   
    • Le forum des Electrons Libres de l'AF
Réponse #4 le: 04 November 2015 à 21:11
Voici ma traduction

Chers volontaires d'Einstein@Home,

La mise à jour des détecteurs LIGO s'est achevée après 5 ans de travaux et nous avons fait un grand pas en nous rapprochant de la première détection directe d'ondes gravitationnelles laquelle marquera le début d'une nouvelle ère de l'astronomie. Au moment de l'écriture de cette lettre d'information, Advanced LIGO a commencé sa première série d'observation « 01 », après sa phase de mise en service étendue et une batterie de test techniques  L'équipe d'Einstein@Home est vraiment excitée et attend avec impatience les données de la plus sensible onde gravitationnelle jamais enregistrée.

Dans la première semaine de Septembre, plus de 200 scientifiques des ondes gravitationnelles de la collaboration du LIGO Virgo se sont rassemblés pour leur réunion d'automne. De nombreux membres de l'équipe Einstein étaient présents et ont rendu compte de leurs recherches en cours sur les ondes gravitationnelles. Pendant cette réunion, le 7ème numéro du LIGO magazine, comportant un article de 4 pages sur Einsten@Home, est sorti. Vous pouvez le lire gratuitement ici [1].

Notre seconde lettre d'informations de cette année comporte des nouvelles de l'administration et des mises à jour du projet de nos trois recherches sur les étoiles à neutrons à rotations rapides (à travers les ondes gravitationnelles, les ondes radio et les rayons gamma). Nous sommes très heureux de déclarer 3 nouvelles découvertes ! Une a été réalisée grâce aux données du télescope spatial Gamma-Ray Fermi de la NASA et 3 autres grâce aux données du télescope radio d'Arecibo. Voir ci-dessous pour plus de détails sur ces découvertes.

Noter que nous communiquons sur un poste d'ingénieur informatique à Einstein@Home à l'UWM de Milwaukee [2]. Si vous avez les compétences requises et que vous êtes intéressé, veuillez faire votre demande.

Bruce Allen, Directeur, Einstein@Home


Nouvelles sur la recherche des ondes gravitationnelles (M. Alessandra Papa)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
La recherche plein ciel d'Einstein@Home de signaux continus d'onde gravitationnelle dans la gamme de fréquence de 50 à 510 Hz en est aux dernières étapes. Grâce à votre soutien constant, nous avons assez de puissance de calcul (de traitement) pour mettre en œuvre une hiérarchie de suivi. Chaque étape était plus délicate que la précédente et agrandirait un signal s'il était présent et rejetterait de plus en plus de fausses alarmes (variations aléatoires du bruit imitant un signal).

A la date de la première lettre d'information, nous avions terminé le premier suivi (FU1), lequel portait sur un total de 16 millions de candidats. A partir de cela, le prochaine étape (FU2) suivait environ 5,5 millions, en utilisant une configuration différente pour augmenter la sensibilité. Les données étaient divisées en 40 segments, chacun avec un temps d'observation uniforme plus long, à savoir 140 heures contre 60 heures utilisées pour FU1. Environ 1 candidat sur 5 qui étaient examinés avec FU2 méritait d'être inspecté minutieusement durant la troisième étape de suivi (FU3).
La troisième et dernière étape utilise des segments de données de 140 heures de temps d'observation uniforme (comme FU2) mais avec une grille plus fine dans un espace paramétrique, agrandissant et augmentant la sensibilité. Selon nos études, cela devrait nous donner au moins une augmentation de 40 % du rapport signal bruit. Cela est suffisant pour séparer en toute confiance un possible signal de bruit de fond. En fait, nous nous attendons à n'avoir que quelques candidats sortant de FU3, lequel pourrait être confirmé ou rejeté en se basant sur des études spécifiques de candidats adaptés.

FU3 est un court essai, de l'ordre de quelques semaines, et qui s'est terminé fin Septembre. Si nous voyons quelque chose, ce sera extrêmement excitant ! Sinon, nous pourrons fixer une limite supérieure plus contraignante sur l'amplitude des ondes gravitationnelles continues. Et enfin, les détecteurs plus sensibles et améliorés de l'Advanced LIGO ont été branchés ces jours, et nous ne pouvons plus attendre pour examiner cette nouvelle donnée.


Nouvelles sur la recherche de pulsar binaire radio (Benjamin Knispel)
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Notre recherche réalisable des pulsars radio les plus actifs est une nouvelle analyse plus sensible de l'étude Parkes Multi-beam Pulsar (PMPS). Elle couvre un plus large espace paramétrique que celle du même ensemble de données d'une recherche précédente d'Einstein@Home. Depuis son démarrage en Mars, nous avons traité approximativement 30 % de toutes les observations. Jusqu'à présent, aucune nouvelle découverte n'a été faite, mais nous avons vu quelques candidats intéressants et nous avons redécouvert beaucoup de pulsars connus.

Chaque fois que nous obtenons de nouvelles données de l'étude PALFA avec le télescope d'Arecibo, nous les envoyons immédiatement à vos GPUs et vos appareils Android. Au cours des mois passés, nous avons reçu quatre lots de nouvelle données. Dans les dernières données, nous avons découvert de nouveaux pulsars radio. Trois d'entre eux (J1955+29, J1853+00, et J1853+0029) ont déjà été confirmés par l'observation de suivi requise. Félicitations à Przemek Wisialski et Gary S. Grant II, Robert Dolezal et Jim Trettel, et [TiDC] Chulma – S'inergy et boinc_qc dont les ordinateurs ont trouvé des pulsars avec la plus haute importance statistique. Les observations de suivi pour le candidat restant seront bientôt effectué par le télescope radio d'Arecibo.

Enfin, un document faisant état d'un découverte antérieure d'un pulsar radio dans les données PALFA a été publié dans l'Astrophysical Journal [3]. Vous pouvez le lire gratuitement sur le serveur d'épreuve arXiv [4]. Le document présente la découverte d'un pulsar milliseconde qui a une orbite remarquablement excentrée, et examine ce système et les 4 autres connus et similaires pour savoir comment ils auraient pu se former. En tous cas, ils n'ont pas pu se former par ce que nous pensons être la voie standard de formation des pulsars millisecondes, par exemple, à travers l'accélération de la rotation d'un vieux pulsar par transfert de matière d'une étoile compagnonne. Vous pouvez lire un peu plus ici [5].


Nouvelles sur la recherche de pulsar gamma (Holger Pletsch)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
Les diverses améliorations offertes par la dernière étude toujours en cours, sur les sources inconnues de rayons gamma, a porté ses premiers fruits. Au début de ce mois, nous annoncions la découverte Einstein@Home d'un nouveau pulsar gamma caché dans les données du télescope spatial Fermi, laquelle a été publiée dans les lettres de l'Astrophysical Journal [6] (pré-impression en accès ouvert disponible ici [7], accompagnement de communiqué de presse ici [8]). Davantage de découvertes excitantes de candidats sont actuellement étudiées en détail. Nous examinons la faisabilité d'étendre l'étude à d'autres types de système pulsar non encore recherchés dans Einstein@Home.


Nouvelles de l'administration du projet (Bernd Machenschalk)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Concernant la recherche de pulsar gamma, nous avons distribué de nouvelles versions de l'application qui inclut une correction de bogue mineure (typo dans une constante numérique) et la fonction de checkpointing au cours de la dernière étape de la tâche (« suivi »), laquelle ne pouvait pas auparavant être interrompu à tout moment . Cela nous permet maintenant  d'améliorer légèrement le nombre de candidats suivis pour intercaler le dernier bit de sensibilité hors du calcul .

Le « S6Bucket Follow-Up run #2 » a pris fin (voir au-dessus) et la troisième étape de suivi s'exécutera jusqu’à la fin Septembre. Après la fin de cette troisième étape, il n'y aura plus de nouvelles recherches sur les ondes gravitationnelles pour un moment, et les projets CPUs seront à 100 % sur la recherche de pulsar gamma.

Les applications de la recherche des pulsars binaires radio ont aussi été mises à jour : des optimisations qui réduisent principalement la quantité de données qui doit être échangée entre les mémoires des GPU et des CPU, ont été implémentées à la fois pour les applications BRP4 (Données Arecibo) et BRP6 (Données Barkes) dans leurs versions 1.52. Il en résulte une accélération qui peut aller jusqu'à 50 %. Les applications CUDA actuellement en test bêta ont aussi été mises à jour vers la version 5.5 de CUDA (La version 3.2 de CUDA était auparavant utilisée). Le gain de vitesse obtenu grâce à l'utilisation de ces versions dépend beaucoup de la carte utilisée (GPU), il varie de 0 à 50 %.

Concernant l'infrastructure générale du serveur, nous avons effectué de nombreuses mises à jour de sécurité et systèmes additionnelles et nous sommes dans un processus de remplacement des vieux serveurs qui deviennent peu fiables par rapport à du matériel neuf.

[1] http://www.ligo.org/magazine/LIGO-magazine-issue-7.pdf#page=18
[2] http://jobs.uwm.edu/postings/23976
[3] http://iopscience.iop.org/0004-637X/806/1/140/
[4] http://arxiv.org/abs/1504.03684
[5] http://einstein.phys.uwm.edu/forum_thread.php?id=11257
[6] http://iopscience.iop.org/2041-8205/809/1/L2/
[7] http://arxiv.org/abs/1508.00779/
[8] http://www.aei.mpg.de/1689618/EatHGPSRHidden

Si vous voulez discuter de cette lettre d'informations avec d'autres volontaires d'Einstein@Home, et les développeurs et les scientifiques du projet, rendez-vous dans ce fil de discussion du forum :
http://einstein.phys.uwm.edu/forum_thread.php?id=11499


Merci pour votre soutien constant, Bruce Allen, Benjamin Knispel,
Bernd Machenschalk, M. Alessandra Papa, and Holger Pletsch de l'équipe Einstein@Home

Beau boulot  :jap: :jap: :jap: Quelques bricoles ;)



Hors ligne Jaehaerys Targaryen

  • CàA
  • Boinc'eur devant l'éternel
  • *****
  • Messages: 10388
  •   
Réponse #5 le: 07 November 2015 à 12:27
Cool çà vas faire bien dans sur la page du projet sur le portail  :D



Twitter : devweborne // Chaine Youtube : https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCXcoCd-1UlHpYIYzNER0n1Q


Hors ligne ousermaatre

  • Gentil admin
  • Boinc'eur devant l'éternel
  • *******
  • Messages: 12216
  •   
    • E-mail

Hors ligne [AF>Amis des Lapins] Jean-Luc

  • Boinc'eur devant l'éternel
  • *****
  • Messages: 3377
  •   
    • Le calcul partagé en atsronomie sous BOINC
    • E-mail
Réponse #7 le: 02 December 2015 à 21:22
Merci Elgrande71 pour ce travail colossal !!!
Jean-Luc



Rédacteur d'un article sur BOINC, adresse :
http://www.astrocaw.eu/?p=605
Créateur d'un site actif de recherche sur les suites aliquotes :
http://www.aliquotes.com/


Hors ligne [AF>Libristes>Jip] Elgrande71

  • Gentil admin
  • Boinc'eur devant l'éternel
  • *******
  • Messages: 5105
  •   
    • [AF>Libristes] - La Mini-Team Libristes de L'Alliance Francophone sur BOINC
    • E-mail
Réponse #8 le: 04 December 2015 à 17:12
Il faut aussi notamment remercié Maurice Goulois et Ousermaatre pour leur soutien et la relecture .  :jap:

Debian - Distribution GNU/Linux de référence
Parabola GNU/Linux - Distribution GNU/Linux Libre
MX Linux
Emmabuntüs

Jabber elgrande71@chapril.org


En ligne Maurice Goulois

  • Boinc'eur devant l'éternel
  • *****
  • Messages: 4544
  •   
    • Le forum des Electrons Libres de l'AF
Réponse #9 le: 04 December 2015 à 18:39
C'est un gros morceau à digérer  :jap:
« Modifié: 04 December 2015 à 18:41 par Maurice Goulois »