Le Forum de l'Alliance Francophone

Nouvelles:

  • Projet du Mois FB: Asteroids@home

Auteur Sujet: [Einstein@home] qu'est ce que einstein@home???  (Lu 16295 fois)

0 Membres et 1 Invité sur ce sujet

Hors ligne ToOm

  • Boinc'eur Junior
  • **
  • Messages: 138
Réponse #25 le: 16 February 2005 à 06:16
Agent Ripper déja réveillé ou pas encore couché ? :D



Hors ligne kerguelen

  • Boinc'eur Junior
  • **
  • Messages: 98
Réponse #26 le: 18 February 2005 à 09:47
Pour la parallaxe, c'est ici.
La triangulation est une méthode de mesure des distances qui utilise la parallaxe.



Hors ligne Douglas Riper

  • Membre d'honneur
  • Boinc'eur devant l'éternel
  • *
  • Messages: 4711
  •   
Réponse #27 le: 18 February 2005 à 20:22
Merci :jap:



Hors ligne arnaud25

  • Boinc'eur devant l'éternel
  • *****
  • Messages: 1162
Réponse #28 le: 19 February 2005 à 17:07
Salut,

Il y a un excellent dossier sur la Relativité Générale sur le Site de Futura Science. Et il y a une page concernant les Ondes Gravitationelles: ici



Hors ligne jmb59

  • Boinc'eur Respectable
  • ****
  • Messages: 548
Réponse #29 le: 20 February 2005 à 11:22
excellent ce dossier !



Hors ligne arnaud25

  • Boinc'eur devant l'éternel
  • *****
  • Messages: 1162
Réponse #30 le: 23 February 2005 à 17:53
Citer
I am not sure what I am seeing. For example one of my WU is named:
H1_0510.9__0511.4_0.1_T01_Test02_0
 
Does that mean that it is searching for periods of 510.9 to 511.4 Hz????

Close. Actually the first number is part of the definition of the data segment you are lookig into:
H1_0510.9 means Hanford data, instrument 1 (there are two in Hanford), frequency band starting at 0510.9 Hz.
The second number ist the more precise frequency you are actually loking for, in this case 511.4 Hz. The bandwith a single Result looks into is currently set to about 0.1 Hz. I didn't make up the data sets, but I think the 0.1 in the name is meant to reflect this (there are some 0.1 values around...).




Hors ligne mysti13

  • Boinc'eur Respectable
  • ****
  • Messages: 804
Réponse #31 le: 23 February 2005 à 17:56
 :jap: C'est toujours bon à savoir ...



Hors ligne arnaud25

  • Boinc'eur devant l'éternel
  • *****
  • Messages: 1162
Réponse #32 le: 05 March 2005 à 18:34
Ce que fait E@H. Trouvé sur le forum E@H
J'ai pas le temps de traduire, désolé.

Citer
Einstein@Home isn't really looking for an interference pattern between different points, but that leads to an explanation of interferometry which I think I'll postpone for another day.

The LIGO Science Collaboration is implementing several pulsar searches, but the one Einstein@Home is running is the "all-sky pulsar search" as you will see at the top of every WU page. This is not a search for the known pulsars whose locations you see on the screensaver. This is a systematic search of the sky, one location at a time, for any periodic gravitational wave coming from that location. It has to be done for each location because the frequency shifts (Doppler shifts) due to the Earth's motion are different for different sky locations. There are additional Doppler shifts for pulsars in binaries, but the current application is only looking for isolated pulsars.

Most of your CPU cycles are going into Fourier transforms. If you don't know, a Fourier transform is a way of looking at a time series as a sum of sine waves at different frequencies. Pulsar signals should be nearly sinusoidal after the Doppler shifts are taken out, so Fourier transforms pick them up pretty easily. Fourier transforms are numerically pretty efficient, but there are an awful lot of them to do in an all-sky search. That is why Einstein@Home is doing this particular search, and not for example the searches for known pulsars which can be done pretty quickly on a single computer.

Later on Einstein@Home might do some other searches, but the consensus was that this was the best fit (at least for now) because (1) it is the most expensive in CPU cycles, and thus the best use of the enormous power you all are donating, and (2) people would probably be more excited about going after something brand spanking new than a pulsar that's been seen in radio, x-rays, etc for years. I think also that (3) we know where the radio pulsars etc are, but a previously unknown one (whose radio beam isn't pointed towards Earth) might happen to be much closer and thus a much stronger source of gravitational waves. We set our long-term goals by the sources we already know, but we cross our fingers and hope for a pleasant surprise.

Hope this helps,
Ben






Hors ligne Djezz

  • Boinc'eur devant l'éternel
  • *****
  • Messages: 1646
Réponse #33 le: 05 March 2005 à 21:36
Mets le sur le forum trad, comme ça si quelqu'un y passe un jour ;)



Hors ligne arnaud25

  • Boinc'eur devant l'éternel
  • *****
  • Messages: 1162
Réponse #34 le: 07 March 2005 à 18:08
Salut,
Lundi à 19h00 sur Arte, il y a un documentaire sur Einstein et la Relativité. C'est le 1er volet (il y en a 3)
C'est un très bon programme.

Edit: Ben, je me suis trompé, c'est pas le prg que j'avais vu. C'est sur la théorie des cordes :whistle:
Mais c'est intéressant quand même, et c'est sympa de voir les auteurs des bouquins qu'on a lu.



Hors ligne ToOm

  • Boinc'eur Junior
  • **
  • Messages: 138
Réponse #35 le: 21 March 2005 à 04:13
J'ai regardé avec la + grande attention un épisode sur lequel je suis tombé par hasard.. vraiment dingue tout ce qui était dit, aec la théorie de M, les membranes.. univers parallèle... waow j'adore !!! Je crois que j'ai loupé une vocation... :(



Hors ligne philmo

  • Boinc'eur devant l'éternel
  • *****
  • Messages: 2524
  •   
Réponse #36 le: 31 March 2005 à 12:37
-->Xter : il faudrait mettre à jour le premier post avec la dernière version de notre article ;) (http://boincest.free.fr/viewtop.php?t=127)



xterminator757288

  • Invité
Réponse #37 le: 31 March 2005 à 19:26
j vais le faire ;)