Le Forum de l'Alliance Francophone

Nouvelles:

  • Projet du Mois FB: Primegrid

Auteur Sujet: Cosmology@home dans le Chicago Tribune  (Lu 6971 fois)

0 Membres et 1 Invité sur ce sujet

Hors ligne rom_185

  • Boinc'eur devant l'éternel
  • *****
  • Messages: 5215
  •   
    • le portail de l'alliance
le: 27 December 2007 à 15:17
http://www.chicagotribune.com/services/newspaper/printedition/tuesday/chi-computer_25dec25,0,2528641.story

Citer
By Jeremy Manier |  Tribune staff reporter
    December 25, 2007

 Not many insurance company employees can say they help unravel the secrets of the universe in their spare time.

Jeff Renkar can.

Day and night, the number-crunching power of Renkar's six personal computers at his home outside Houston is helping run complex simulations of how the early universe evolved, as part of a new University of Illinois project called Cosmology@home.

In the eight years since the California-based SETI Institute thought of embedding software in people's screen savers that would help sift through radio noise from space for possible signals from alien civilizations, some 40 research groups have launched projects based on the same principle. Hundreds of thousands of computers have been enlisted to study how proteins fold, to search for new prime numbers and to simulate climate change, among other efforts.

The Internet-based strategy is changing how scientists think about their largest computing projects. Tapping the unused processing capacity of a network of individual PCs offers the power of an expensive supercomputer at a fraction of the cost and allows researchers to cut the lag time for some calculations from years to days.

Such "volunteer computing" studies have also spawned a quirky global subculture of home enthusiasts who are bringing their personal passion and the collaborative power of the Internet to the most refined domains of science. Like Renkar, they enjoy pushing their computers to the limit while donating something to basic science or the hunt for disease cures.

Many volunteers are computer programmers or scientists, but others have no link to the projects aside from their own enthusiasm. Their homes are scattered around the globe, from Sweden to sub-Saharan Africa, from East Timor to East L.A. Those helping the U. of I. project include a train driver in Britain, a retired correctional worker from Oklahoma with an interest in astronomy, and a "Star Trek" fan club "commander" in Des Moines.



Once a hobby, now a mission

For Renkar, a Chicago native who built his own telescopes as a boy on the Southwest Side, contributing to the study of the universe's origins fulfills a childhood dream. What started as a casual hobby has become something of a mission.

"I've always been kind of a wannabe scientist," Renkar said. "Now I feel I'm really helping science produce new results and discoveries."

To join the projects, computer owners download a program that lets their PCs work on small pieces of a larger research problem. When a PC finishes a chunk of the calculation, it sends it off to be double-checked and plugged into the big data set.

One initiative has wooed gamers who use the Sony PlayStation 3 console, which contains a speedy graphics processor. A Stanford University protein study called Folding@home now gets the majority of its processing work from the consoles.

"I donate to other causes, and I just considered this a donation to society and science," said Cory Parker, a product assurance technician from Inverness who runs Folding@home software on his four Sony game consoles. He said he uses only one PlayStation for gaming; the other three are damaged units that he bought at a discount just to further the study.

The sheer number of people needed to make such projects worthwhile can be daunting, researchers said. Folding@home, which began in 2000 and is one of the largest undertakings, uses about 250,000 computers at any given moment.

Maintaining all those volunteers' excitement about the often arcane questions the projects are supposed to address is a major challenge, said U. of I. physics professor Benjamin Wandelt, director of Cosmology@home.

"This is democratic computing, so it's based on the goodwill of a bunch of people from all walks of life, all backgrounds," Wandelt said. "If as a researcher you cannot communicate what's interesting about your problem to the general public, this sort of thing probably isn't for you."

Wandelt wanted to test how minor changes to initial conditions after the Big Bang could have affected how our cosmos would look billions of years later. Knowing how that process works could tell physicists more about what our own universe must have been like at the beginning.

To address that question, Wandelt's team runs thousands of computer simulations of cosmological evolution and tinkers with the initial conditions, such as the speed of the universe's expansion or the amounts of certain fundamental particles.

But he realized that the initial set of simulations would take about 300,000 hours of computer time -- about 30 years using an ordinary home computer. By distributing the computing chore among 2,800 users from 78 countries, Wandelt's team has amassed more than 300,000 hours of work in just six months' time.



Overwhelming interest

BOINC, les grandes énigmes de la science résolues en 2 temps 3 calculs
I reject your reality and substitue my own


Hors ligne Heyoka

  • Boinc'eur devant l'éternel
  • *****
  • Messages: 4064
  •   
Réponse #1 le: 27 December 2007 à 19:22
Il y a même 2 pages :

Citer
"I thought people would be enthusiastic, but the response swept us off our feet," Wandelt said. He said 100 people registered on his project's Web site before he'd even announced it to the public.

Kathryn Marks, an American teaching English as a second language in South Korea, said she decided to help the U. of I. study because of her "intrinsic thirst for knowledge."

"I've always looked up at the stars and wondered where we came from and where we're going," Marks said.

Related links

    *Searching the universe from home Searching the universe from home

For some volunteers, the online projects can become a slightly manic obsession.

"It's a hobby. An addiction even," wrote Guy Pauwels, a Folding@home devotee in Belgium, via e-mail. He said he belongs to a team of "folders," as they call themselves, and they organize competitions with teams in other countries to see whose computers can complete the most work.

Programs such as Folding@home provide the most demanding tests of a PC's performance, many users say. Amassing an impressive processing record is a mark of achievement, and it earns users "points" -- statistics that are worthless except as tokens of a user's computing prowess.

To rack up more points, many volunteers buy computers solely to use on the projects. Dr. Michael McCord, a retired anesthesiologist from Beaumont, Texas, said he has seven PCs running the Folding@home software full time -- and many users devote even more computers to the cause.

"The competition and camaraderie got me interested," McCord said. "I'm blessed that I can afford the electricity bill."

That level of dedication came as a surprise to David Anderson, a research scientist at the University of California, Berkeley who wrote the original SETI@home software and developed the framework that many newer projects use. He said he'd like to make volunteer computing so easy for scientists to use that even an ordinary graduate student could rely on it to crack lengthy calculations.

"Our goal is to make volunteer computing into kind of a new paradigm," Anderson said. "It could be a standard tool that all scientists who need a lot of computing power can turn to."

So far, volunteer computing has not changed how physicists think about the universe or led to any concrete cures for diseases, but researchers say they've published intriguing work stemming from the approach. Wandelt of Illinois said his team has just submitted its first paper based on results from Cosmology@home. He said he's found a way to distill his data so other cosmologists can run more speedy simulations of the early universe.

Vijay Pande, director of Folding@home, said his team has published 54 studies based on its protein-folding simulations. Proteins must fold into precise shapes in order to function properly, and many diseases can be traced to errors in folding, including Alzheimer's disease and ALS. Pande's work is designed to offer insights into that process and aid the design of drugs that could help crucial proteins fold correctly.

Yet not every scientific question lends itself to being solved by thousands of computers, each working on one tiny piece of the problem, Pande said.

"A pregnancy takes nine months, but you can't get nine women together and get it done in a month," he said. "Some problems can't be divided."




Hors ligne rom_185

  • Boinc'eur devant l'éternel
  • *****
  • Messages: 5215
  •   
    • le portail de l'alliance
Réponse #2 le: 27 December 2007 à 19:47
Ha wai  :ouch:.
J'avais pô vu...

BOINC, les grandes énigmes de la science résolues en 2 temps 3 calculs
I reject your reality and substitue my own


Hors ligne rom_185

  • Boinc'eur devant l'éternel
  • *****
  • Messages: 5215
  •   
    • le portail de l'alliance
Réponse #3 le: 30 December 2007 à 02:20
Citer
Peu d'employés de compagnie d'assurance peuvent dirent qu'ils aident à démêler les secrets de l'univers pendants leur temps libre.
 
Jeff Renkar, lui, le peut.
 
Jour et nuit, Renkar aide à exécuter de nombreuses simulations complexes de la façon dont a évolué le début de l'univers, grâce aux calculs et de la puissance de six ordinateurs personnels à son domicile, en dehors de Houston, dans le cadre d'un nouveau projet de l'université de l'Illinois appelé Cosmologie@home.
 
Au cours des huit années écoulées la SETI Institute, depuis son siège en Californie, à pensée à inclure un logiciel dans les économiseurs d'écran qui aideraient à tamiser le bruit radioélectrique de l'espace pour découvrir d'éventuels signaux provenant de civilisations exotiques, quelque 40 groupes de recherche ont lancé des projets basés sur le même principe. Des centaines de milliers d'ordinateurs ont été mobilisés pour étudier comment les protéines ce pli, à la recherche de nouveaux nombres premiers et de simuler les changements climatiques, entre autres efforts.

BOINC, les grandes énigmes de la science résolues en 2 temps 3 calculs
I reject your reality and substitue my own


Hors ligne Heyoka

  • Boinc'eur devant l'éternel
  • *****
  • Messages: 4064
  •   
Réponse #4 le: 30 December 2007 à 17:33
Je prend la 2ème partie.
rom_185, il faudrait que tu passe le sujet dans la partie "à traduire"


Hors ligne philmo

  • Boinc'eur devant l'éternel
  • *****
  • Messages: 2524
  •   
Réponse #5 le: 30 December 2007 à 17:36
fait ;)



Hors ligne Heyoka

  • Boinc'eur devant l'éternel
  • *****
  • Messages: 4064
  •   
Réponse #6 le: 31 December 2007 à 00:28
voila la 2ème partie à relire, il y a des passages très approximatifs

Citer
J'envisageais que les gens soient enthousiastes, mais les réactions ont été au delà de toute les espérances" confie Wandelt. Il précise que 100 personnes se sont inscrites sur son projet avant même qu'il ait eu le temps de l'annoncer publiquement

Kathryn Marks une enseignante américaine d'anglais comme seconde langue en Corée du Sud, assure qu'elle est décidée à aider l'Université de l'Illinois en raison de "son soif naturelle de connaissance."

Et elle ajoute : "j'ai toujours levé les yeux vers les étoiles pour me demander d'où nous venons et ou nous allons"

Pour certains bénévoles, les projets en ligne peuvent devenir une obsession.

"C'est un passe-temps. Une activité addictive", écrit dans son mail le belge Guy Pauwels, un inconditionnel de Folding@home. Il explique qu'il appartient à une équipe de "plieurs", comme ils se nomment eux-mêmes, et ils organisent des compétitions avec des équipes d'autres pays afin de voir quels ordinateurs pourront accomplir le plus de travail.

Les programmes tels que Folding@home fournissent les tests les plus exigeants des performances d'un PC, comme le soulignent de nombreux utilisateurs. Accumuler les impressionnantes archives des calculs effectués est le symbole d'une réussite, ce le rôle des points que chaque utilisateur engrange -- les statistiques sont sans valeur à part celle qui permet de gager de ses prouesses informatiques.

Pour marquer le plus de points, de nombreux bénévoles achètent les ordinateurs avec pour seul but de les utiliser pour les projets. Le Dr. Michael McCord, un anesthésiste à la retraite vivant à Beaumont (Texas), avoue qu'il possède 7 PC pour faire tourner à plein temps le projet Folding@home. Et de nombreux utilisateurs consacrent encore plus d'ordinateurs à la cause.

"La compétition et la camaraderie m'intéressent", ajoute McCord. "Je suis bénie car je peux me permettre d'avoir une telle facture d'électricité."

Ce niveau de dévouement est une surprise pour David Anderson (chercheur à l'Université de Californie, Berkeley), développeur de SETI@home classique et du cadriciel utilisé par de nombreux nouveaux projets. Il explique qu'il souhaite rendre le calcul bénévole tellement facile à utiliser pour les scientifiques que même un simple étudiant diplômé pourrait compter sur le calcul partagé pour arriver à bout de ces calculs prolongés.

«Notre objectif est de faire du calcul bénévole un nouveau paradigme», poursuit Anderson. "Ce pourrait être un outil standart que tout scientifique à la recherche puissance de calcul pourrait utiliser."

Jusqu'à présent, le calcul bénévole n'a pas encore changé la façon dont les physiciens pensent l'univers et n'a abouti à aucun résultat concret dans le traitement des maladies, mais les chercheurs disent qu'ils ont publié des travaux fascinant sur cette approche. Wandelt de l'Illinois indique que son équipe vient de présenter sa première publication suite aux résultats de Cosmology@home. Il explique qu'il a trouvé une façon de distiller ses données pour que les autres cosmologistes puissent faire fonctionner plus rapidement des simulations de l'univers primitif.

Vijay Pande, directeur de Folding@home, déclare que son équipe a publié 54 articles sur la simulation du repliement des protéines. Pour fonctionner correctement, les protéines doivent se replier en des formes précises, et de nombreuses maladies peuvent être attribuées à des erreurs de repliement, y compris la maladie d'Alzheimer et la sclérose latérale amyotrophique (maladie de Charcot). Le travail de Pande a pour objectif d'offrir un aperçu de ces processus ainsi qu'une aide à la conception de médicaments qui pourraient aider à replier correctement les protéines importantes.

Cependant, toutes les questions des scientifiques n'ont pas vocation à être résolu par des milliers d'ordinateurs travaillant chacun sur un minuscule bout du problème, dit Pande.

«Une grossesse prend neuf mois, mais vous ne pouvez pas aller chercher neuf femmes et faire cet enfant en un mois. Certains problèmes ne peuvent être divisés."


Hors ligne rom_185

  • Boinc'eur devant l'éternel
  • *****
  • Messages: 5215
  •   
    • le portail de l'alliance
Réponse #7 le: 31 December 2007 à 01:59
Citer
La stratégie fondée sur Internet est en train de changer la façon dont les scientifiques pensent à leurs plus grands projets de calcul.  
En tirant partie de la puissance inutilisée des capacités de traitement de donnés d'un réseau d'ordinateurs individuels cela offre la puissance d'un superordinateur mais à faible coût et permet aux chercheurs de réduire le temps de latence des calculs de quelques années à quelques jours.
 


BOINC, les grandes énigmes de la science résolues en 2 temps 3 calculs
I reject your reality and substitue my own


Hors ligne rom_185

  • Boinc'eur devant l'éternel
  • *****
  • Messages: 5215
  •   
    • le portail de l'alliance
Réponse #8 le: 31 December 2007 à 02:14
Citer
Ces études de"volontaires" informatique ont également donné lieu à une étrange culture mondiale. Depuis leur maison, des amateurs partagent leurs passions personnelles et collaborent aux plus raffinés domaines de recherche scientifique grace à leur puissance informatique via Internet. Comme Renkar, ils aiment pousser leurs ordinateurs à leurs limites tout en donnant quelque chose à la science fondamentale ou de la chasse à la maladie guérit.
 
Beaucoup de bénévoles sont des programmeurs ou des scientifiques, mais d'autres n'ont pas de lien avec les projets en dehors de leur propre enthousiasme. Leurs maisons sont éparpillées dans le monde entier, de la Suède à l'Afrique sub-saharienne, du Timor-Oriental à Los Angeles. Ceux aidant à comprendre le projet I. et U. (éké  :heink: ? sont :un conducteur de train en Grande-Bretagne, un ouvrier correctionnel retraité de l'Oklahoma avec un intérêt pour l'astronomie. Et un fan club "Star Trek commander" à DES Moines.
Du mal sur la fin :/, surement des corrections à faire donc ;).

BOINC, les grandes énigmes de la science résolues en 2 temps 3 calculs
I reject your reality and substitue my own


Hors ligne rom_185

  • Boinc'eur devant l'éternel
  • *****
  • Messages: 5215
  •   
    • le portail de l'alliance
Réponse #9 le: 02 January 2008 à 02:25
Citer
Autrefois un passe-temps, maintenant une mission
 
Pour Renkar, un natif de Chicago qui a construit ses propres télescopes comme un garçon de la côte sud-ouest, contribuant à l'étude des origines de l'univers et répondant ainssi à un rêve d'enfant. Ce qui a commencé comme un passe-temps occasionnel est devenu comme d'une mission.

Renkar raconte que :
"J'ai toujours eu l'obligeance d'un ambitieux scientifique" et  "Aujourd'hui, je crois que je vais vraiment faire de nouveaux résultats pour aider science et de nombreuses découvertes."
 
Pour rejoindre les projets, les propriétaires d'ordinateurs télécharge un programme qui permet de calculer sur leur PC de petits morceaux d'un plus grand problème de recherche. Quand un PC finit un fragment du calcul, il envoie le tout pour vérification par la base de données via internet.
 
Une initiative a courtisé les joueurs qui utilisent la console PlayStation 3 de Sony, qui contient un processeur graphique puissant. L'Université de Stanford étudie les protéines grâce à Folding@home, qui reçoit maintenant la majorité de ses travaux de calculs de la console.
 
"Je fais don à d'autres causes, et je considère ceci juste comme donation pour la science et la société", a déclaré Cory Parker, un technicien en produit d'assurance de Inverness qui exécute le logiciel Folding@home, sur ses quatre consoles de jeux Sony. Il a dit qu'il utilise une seule PlayStation pour les jeux, les trois autres sont des appareils endommagées qu'il a achetés avec une décote juste pour promouvoir la recherche.

BOINC, les grandes énigmes de la science résolues en 2 temps 3 calculs
I reject your reality and substitue my own


Hors ligne rom_185

  • Boinc'eur devant l'éternel
  • *****
  • Messages: 5215
  •   
    • le portail de l'alliance
Réponse #10 le: 02 January 2008 à 16:05
Citer
Le nombre de personnes nécessaires pour que de tels projets soient valables peut être décourageants, ont avoués certains chercheurs. Folding@home, qui a débuté en 2000, est l'un des plus grands projet, il utilise environ 250 000 ordinateurs en permanence.
 
Le soutien de tous ces volontaires est stimulés par des obscures questions, souvent les projets sont censés répondre est un défi majeur, a déclaré le professeur de physique U. et I. ( :heink: ) Benjamin Wandelt, directeur de cosmologie@home.
 
"Ce calcul est démocratique, il est basé sur la bonne volonté d'un groupe de personnes de tous horizons, de toutes origines," Wandelt ajoute que "Si en tant que chercheur, vous ne pouvez pas communiquer ce qui est intéressant dans votre problème au grand public, ceci n'est probablement pas pour vous "

BOINC, les grandes énigmes de la science résolues en 2 temps 3 calculs
I reject your reality and substitue my own


Hors ligne rom_185

  • Boinc'eur devant l'éternel
  • *****
  • Messages: 5215
  •   
    • le portail de l'alliance
Réponse #11 le: 02 January 2008 à 23:39
Citer
Wandelt a voulu examiner comment les changements mineurs aux conditions initiales après le Big Bang pourrait avoir affecté comment notre cosmos serrait des milliards d'années après. Savoir comment fonctionne ce processus pourrait en dire plus aux physiciens sur ce que notre propres univers à dût être à ses début.
 
Pour aborder cette question, l'équipe de Wandelt exécute des milliers de simulations de l'évolution cosmologique et joue sur différents paramètres de conditions initiales, telles que la vitesse de l'expansion de l'univers ou la quantité de certaines particules fondamentales.
 
Mais il a constaté que la première série de simulations prendrait environ 300 000 heures de temps processeur -- environ 30 ans pour un simple ordinateur de bureau. En distribuant la corvée de calcul entre 2 800 utilisateurs de 78 pays, Wandelt et son équipe ont accumulé plus de 300 000 heures calculs en seulement six mois.
 
Fantastique intérêt
\o/ !

BOINC, les grandes énigmes de la science résolues en 2 temps 3 calculs
I reject your reality and substitue my own


Hors ligne xipehuz

  • Animateur fanatique
  • Boinc'eur devant l'éternel
  • *****
  • Messages: 1672
  •   
    • Les Xipéhuz
Réponse #12 le: 08 February 2008 à 14:23
 :hello:   aux traducteurs

Je voudrais juste faire le point sur ce qui reste à faire dans cette nouvelle catégorie "A Relire"

Dis moi, Romain, faut-il relire tout ça ou est-ce-que ça a déjà été publié ?

Je prends les compliments comme des reproches d'hypocrites (Palinka)


Hors ligne rom_185

  • Boinc'eur devant l'éternel
  • *****
  • Messages: 5215
  •   
    • le portail de l'alliance
Réponse #13 le: 09 February 2008 à 18:56
A relire aussi :jap:.

BOINC, les grandes énigmes de la science résolues en 2 temps 3 calculs
I reject your reality and substitue my own


Hors ligne xipehuz

  • Animateur fanatique
  • Boinc'eur devant l'éternel
  • *****
  • Messages: 1672
  •   
    • Les Xipéhuz
Réponse #14 le: 18 March 2008 à 17:49
Voila, j'ai rassemblé les différents fragments traduits par Heyoka et rom.

J'avais commencé à faire une relecture/correction des traductions phrase à phrase, mais sur un texte aussi long, c'est extrèmement fastidieux.   :sweat:  

Alors pour éviter de m'endormir sur ma copie   :sleep:  , j'ai décidé de prendre la liberté d'adpater ces 2 traductions à ma sauce.   :sol:  

Ne m'en veuillez pas si j'ai complètement chamboulé votre texte mais sachez que je me suis enormément inspiré de votre travail   :love:  . D'ailleurs certains paragraphes ont été repris tels quels (ou presque   ;)  )

Si ma version ne vous plait pas, ne vous inquiétez pas, vous n'êtes pas obligés de la publier, je ne vous en voudrais pas.
Sinon, n'hésitez pas à y apporter les modifications qui vous sembleraient nécessaires.

Espérant avoir été utile, voici le texte.

---------------------------------------------------------------------

Cosmology@Home dans le Chicago Tribune :

Par Jeremy Manier |  25 Décembre 2007

Peu d'employés de compagnie d'assurance peuvent se targuer d'aider à démêler les secrets de l'univers pendants leur temps libre.

Jeff Renkar, lui, le peut.

Jour et nuit, la puissance de calcul des 6 PC du domicile de Renkar, en banlieu de Houston, est mise à contribution pour faire tourner de complexes simulations de l'évolution du début de l'univers, dans le cadre d'un nouveau projet de l'université de l'Illinois appelé Cosmologie@home.

Au cours des huit années écoulées depuis que l'institut SETI, basé en Californie, a eu l'idée d'intégrer à nos économiseurs d'écran un logiciel permettant de filtrer le bruit radioélectrique en provenance de l'espace pour chercher d'éventuels signaux provenant de civilisations extra-terrestres, quelque 40 groupes de recherche ont lancé des projets basés sur le même principe. Des centaines de milliers d'ordinateurs ont été enrolés pour étudier comment les protéines se replient, pour chercher de nouveaux nombres premiers et pour simuler les changements climatiques, entre autres efforts.

Cette stratégie fondée sur Internet est en train de changer la façon dont les scientifiques se représentent leurs grands projets informatiques.  

Exploiter la capacité de traitement inutilisée de réseaux d'ordinateurs individuels, c'est s'offrir la puissance d'un onéreux superordinateur pour une fraction de son coût et permettre aux chercheurs de réduire le temps d'attente de leurs calculs de quelques années à quelques jours.

Ces études basées sur le "calcul bénévole" ont également engendré une étrange culture mondiale d'amateurs enthousiastes qui apportent leurs propres passions et la puissance de l'outil collaboratif qu'est Internet aux domaines scientifiques les plus raffinés.

Tout comme Renkar, ils aiment pousser les limites de leurs ordinateurs tout en apportant leur contribution aux sciences fondamentales ou à la chasse aux nouveaux remèdes.

 De nombreux bénévoles sont des programmeurs ou des chercheurs, mais d'autres n'ont pour toute connexion à ces projets que leur propre enthousiasme. Ils vivent aux quatre coins du monde, de Suède au Sahara, du Timor-Oriental à Los Angeles. Ceux qui soutiennent le projet de l'Université de l'Illinois sont conducteur de train en Grande-Bretagne, gardien de prison retraité de l'Oklahoma passioné d'astronomie, et même "commandant" d'un fan club de "Star Trek" à Des Moines (Iowa).

Autrefois un passe-temps, maintenant une mission

Pour Renkar, un natif de Chicago qui a passé son enfance dans le quartier Sud-Ouest à construire ses propres télescopes, contribuer à l'étude des origines de l'univers c'est réaliser un rêve d'enfant. Ce qui a commencé comme un passe-temps occasionnel est devenu pour lui comme une mission.

Renkar raconte : "J'ai toujours eu l'âme d'un scientifique. Maintenant, j'ai vraiment l'impression d'aider la science à produire de nouveaux résultats et découvertes."

Pour rejoindre les projets, les propriétaires d'ordinateurs téléchargent un programme qui permet à leurs PC de travailler sur des petits morceaux d'un plus grand problème scientifique. Quand un PC finit un fragment du calcul, il l'envoie pour vérification puis insertion dans la base de données des résultats.

Une de ces initiatives a fait les yeux doux aux joueurs sur console PlayStation 3 de Sony, qui contient un processeur graphique puissant. Une étude des proteines à l'Université de Stanford sous-traite maintenant une majorité de ses calculs à ces consoles.

"Je fais des dons à d'autres causes, et j'ai simplement considéré cela comme une donation à la science et à la société", déclare Cory Parker, un technicien en assurance-qualité d'Inverness qui fait tourner le logiciel Folding@home, sur ses quatre consoles de jeux Sony. Il n'utilise qu'une seule PlayStation pour les jeux, les trois autres sont des appareils endommagées qu'il a acheté au rabais juste pour promouvoir la recherche.

Le nombre incroyable de personnes nécessaire pour que de tels projets en vaillent la peine peut être décourageant, ont avoués certains chercheurs. Folding@home, qui a débuté en 2000 et qui est l'une des plus grands tentatives, utilise environ 250 000 ordinateurs en permanence.

Garder intact l'excitation de tous ces volontaires pour les questions souvent obscures que ces projets sont sensés résoudre est un défi majeur, a déclaré Benjamin Wandelt, professeur de physique à l'Université de l'Illinois, directeur de cosmology@home.

"C'est de l'informatique démocratique, donc basée sur la bonne volonté de quelques personnes de tous horizons et de toutes origines," nous dit Wandelt "Si en tant que chercheur, vous ne savez pas communiquer au grand public ce qui rend votre problème intéressant, ce genre de chose n'est probablement pas fait pour vous "

Wandelt a voulu tester comment des changements mineurs dans les conditions initiales après le Big Bang auraient pu affecter notre cosmos des milliards d'années plus tard. Savoir comment fonctionne ce processus pourrait en apprendre plus aux physiciens sur ce que notre propres univers à dût être à ses début.

Pour répondre à cette question, l'équipe de Wandelt exécute des milliers de simulations de l'évolution cosmologique et joue sur différents paramètres des conditions initiales, telles que la vitesse de l'expansion de l'univers ou la quantité de certaines particules fondamentales.

Mais il a constaté que la première série de simulations devait prendre environ 300 000 heures de temps de calcul -- soit 30 ans d'utilisation d'un simple ordinateur de bureau. En distribuant la corvée de calcul à 2 800 utilisateurs de 78 pays, Wandelt et son équipe ont accumulé plus de 300 000 heures calculs en seulement six mois.

Fantastique intérêt

"Je pensais que les gens seraient enthousiastes, mais leur réaction a dépassé toutes nos espérances" confie Wandelt. Il précise que 100 personnes s'étaient déjà inscrites sur le site internet de son projet avant même qu'il n'ait eu le temps de le dévoiler au public.  

Kathryn Marks une américaine enseignant l'anglais langue étrangère en Corée du Sud, assure qu'elle avait décidé d'aider l'Université de l'Illinois en raison de sa "soif naturelle de connaissance."  

Et elle ajoute : "De toujours, j'ai admiré les étoiles en me demandant d'où nous venions et où nous allions"

Pour certains bénévoles, les projets en ligne peuvent devenir une obsession.

"C'est un passe-temps. Une drogue", écrit dans un courriel le belge Guy Pauwels, inconditionnel de Folding@home. Il explique qu'il appartient à une équipe de "plieurs", comme ils se nomment eux-mêmes, et qu'ils organisent des compétitions avec des équipes d'autres pays pour voir qui aura l'ordinateur qui abbatra le plus de travail.  

Les programmes tels que Folding@home font subir aux PC les tests de performance les plus exigeants, comme le soulignent de nombreux utilisateurs. Accumuler un panel impressionant de résultats de calculs est un symbole de réussite parmi eux, et cela leur rapporte des "points" -- statistiques sans aucune valeur, si ce n'est d'être le gage de leurs prouesses informatiques.

Pour engranger encore plus de points, de nombreux bénévoles n'achètent des ordinateurs que dans le but de les utiliser pour leurs projets. Le Dr. Michael McCord, un anesthésiste à la retraite de Beaumont au Texas, avoue qu'il possède 7 PC qui font tourner à plein temps le logiciel de Folding@home. Et de nombreux utilisateurs consacrent encore plus d'ordinateurs à la cause.

"C'est la compétition et la camaraderie qui m'ont intéréssé", ajoute McCord. "J'ai la chance de pouvoir me permettre une telle facture d'électricité."  

Ce niveau de dévouement fut une surprise pour David Anderson, chercheur à Berkeley - Université de Californie et développeur de SETI@home et du cadriciel utilisé par nombre de nouveaux projets. Il explique qu'il aimerait rendre le calcul bénévole tellement facile à utiliser pour les scientifiques que même un simple étudiant de 3ème cycle pourrait s'en servir pour se débarasser de fastidieux calculs.  

«Notre objectif est de faire du calcul bénévole un nouveau paradigme», poursuit Anderson. "Ce pourrait être un outil de base vers lequel tout chercheur ayant besoin de grosses puissances de calcul pourrait se tourner."  

Jusqu'à présent, le calcul bénévole n'a pas encore changé la façon dont les physiciens pensent l'univers et n'a abouti à aucun traitement concret contre une maladie, mais les chercheurs disent avoir publié des travaux fascinant sur cette approche. Wandelt de l'Université d'Illinois indique que son équipe vient de présenter sa première publication sur les résultats de Cosmology@home. Il explique qu'il a trouvé une façon de distiller ses données qui devrait permettre à d'autres cosmologistes de faire fonctionner des simulations plus rapides de l'univers primitif.

Vijay Pande, directeur de Folding@home, déclare que son équipe a publié 54 articles sur ses simulations du repliement des protéines. Pour fonctionner correctement, les protéines doivent se replier de manière très précises, et de nombreuses maladies peuvent découler d'erreurs de repliement, notamment la maladie d'Alzheimer et la sclérose latérale amyotrophique (maladie de Charcot). Le travail de Pande a pour but de révéler le détail de ces processus et de faciliter la conception de médicaments qui pourraient aider certaines protéines cruciales à se replier correctement.  

Cependant, toutes les questions des scientifiques n'ont pas vocation à être résolu par des milliers d'ordinateurs, chacun d'eux travaillant sur un minuscule bout du problème, dit Pande.  

«Une grossesse, ça prend neuf mois, mais vous ne pouvez pas rassembler neuf femmes pour faire cet enfant en un mois. Certains problèmes ne peuvent pas être divisés."

Je prends les compliments comme des reproches d'hypocrites (Palinka)


Hors ligne rom_185

  • Boinc'eur devant l'éternel
  • *****
  • Messages: 5215
  •   
    • le portail de l'alliance
Réponse #15 le: 21 March 2008 à 20:38
Citer
Si ma version ne vous plait pas, ne vous inquiétez pas, vous n'êtes pas obligés de la publier, je ne vous en voudrais pas.
:lol:
Tu corrige tout et on ne publie pas ton taf'... et puis quoi encore :D.

 :jap: pour tes corrections !

BOINC, les grandes énigmes de la science résolues en 2 temps 3 calculs
I reject your reality and substitue my own


Hors ligne xipehuz

  • Animateur fanatique
  • Boinc'eur devant l'éternel
  • *****
  • Messages: 1672
  •   
    • Les Xipéhuz
Réponse #16 le: 22 March 2008 à 15:32
Content que vous ayez apprécié ma prose. J'avais juste peur que vous n'appréciez pas les libertés que j'avais prise avec votre texte d'origine.  :)

Et merci à Heyoka pour sa relecture et ses petits changements qui améliorent la fluidité de l'ensemble et bien sûr pour avoir publié l'article.  :jap:

ça c'est le genre de collaboration que j'aime, dans l'AF  [:frederic]

Je prends les compliments comme des reproches d'hypocrites (Palinka)


Hors ligne rom_185

  • Boinc'eur devant l'éternel
  • *****
  • Messages: 5215
  •   
    • le portail de l'alliance
Réponse #17 le: 22 March 2008 à 19:10
Citer
Et elle ajoute : "Depuis toujours, j'ai admiré les étoiles en me demandant d'où nous venions et où nous allions"
???

BOINC, les grandes énigmes de la science résolues en 2 temps 3 calculs
I reject your reality and substitue my own